Synthetic Biology meets the real world

This website contains descriptions of interdisciplinary team-based projects that explore the intersection of electronics, 3D printing, sensor technology, low cost DIY instrumentation and biology - and policy workshops and outreach events. These projects aim to build open technologies and promote development of research skills and collaborations. They tap into existing open standards and a rich ecosystem of resources for microcontrollers, first established to simplify programming and physical computing for designers, artists and scientists. These resources provide a simple environment for biologists to learn programming and hardware skills, and develop real-world laboratory tools. Further, the Biomaker projects provide a direct route for physical scientists and engineers to get hands-on experience with biological systems.

Latest News and Updates

Biomaker Challenge: funding for mini-projects

Biomaker Fayre 2017 - exciting showcase for open source DIY science in Cambridge

Biomaker Fayre 2017 - exciting showcase for open source DIY science in Cambridge

The Biomaker Challenge is a annual four-month programme challenging interdisciplinary teams to build low-cost sensors and instruments for biology. From colorimeters to microfluidics and beyond, we’re looking for frugal, open source and DIY approaches to biological experiments and we encourage diversity! Successful applicants receive a £250 Starter Kit (more information here), and up to £750 for addition components, 3D printing, etc. Your project must be documented and publicly accessible, and available for exhibition at a public exhibition of open technology, the Biomaker Fayre during the Open Technology Week in Cambridge (October). Open to workers at the University of Cambridge, John Innes Centre and Earlham Institute, Norwich - and any partners.

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You can find examples of projects at https://github.com/BioMakers, where teams have archived software code. Also head to https://gitter.im/Biomaker-Challenge-Community for online chat about Biomaker Challenge projects and logistics.

We're also using the hackster.io platform for development of project portfolios and connection with that very large community (280,000) of open source hardware hackers and technical experts. (see https://www.hackster.io/biomaker/projects)

Start your plans now for next year's Biomaker Challenge! Let us know if we can help...

Best Biology: PiRMA: A low-cost rodent physiology monitoring bed for pre-clinical experiments, Dominick McIntyre, Lina Hacker & Marcel Gehrung

Best Biology: PiRMA: A low-cost rodent physiology monitoring bed for pre-clinical experiments, Dominick McIntyre, Lina Hacker & Marcel Gehrung

Best Hardware: A low-cost, pressurized liquid chromatography system for protein purification, Stéphanie Polderdijk & Wolfgang Schmied

Best Hardware: A low-cost, pressurized liquid chromatography system for protein purification, Stéphanie Polderdijk & Wolfgang Schmied

Maker Spirit: Macrophotography of fern gametophytes using a DIY focus stacking system, Jennifer Deegan, Matthew Couchman, Richard Mortier & Tim Deegan

Maker Spirit: Macrophotography of fern gametophytes using a DIY focus stacking system, Jennifer Deegan, Matthew Couchman, Richard Mortier & Tim Deegan

Biomaker 2017 trophies

Biomaker 2017 trophies

OpenPlant Fund

The aim of the fund is to promote the development of plant Synthetic Biology as an interdisciplinary field and to facilitate exchange between The University of Cambridge, the John Innes Centre and the Earlham Institute, Norwich for the development of open technologies and responsible innovation in the context of Synthetic Biology.

This call is also encouraging applications related to use of cell-free extracts from bacteria, plants, yeast or other organisms to transcribe and translate engineered DNA. Cell-free synthetic biology is gaining popularity for prototyping genetic circuits and metabolic pathways and has many applications from production of biologics to paper-based diagnostic tests and biosensors.

The OpenPlant Fund supports innovative, open and interdisciplinary projects relevant to plant Synthetic Biology over 2015-19. Up to 20 six-month projects per year will receive £4k each, with an additional £1k awarded on completion for follow-on and outreach.

A new call has just been announced! Application details can be found online at https://www.openplant.org/fund/

Download OpenPlant Handbook 2017 (2nd edition) with details of OpenPlant Fund projects and Biomaker Challenge

Download OpenPlant Handbook 2017 (2nd edition) with details of OpenPlant Fund projects and Biomaker Challenge

Opportunities for collaboration

Since 2014, we have funded small interdisciplinary projects and catalysed new collaborations between several hundred students, researchers and academics across Cambridge, Norwich and beyond. A comprehensive listing of these projects is provided here, along with links to open resources generated during the work. The projects have generated a large number of electronic prototypes, software, 3D printed devices and biological elements. We hope that these resources prove useful and can be built upon by others, especially as initiators for new low-cost approaches to quantitative biology and engineering for teaching and research. Please contact us if we can assist in any way.

The Biomaker projects have been funded from a variety of sources, starting with support for mini-projects by a Strategic Research Initiative in Synthetic Biology at the University of Cambridge. This was followed by major support (£0.5M) from the BBSRC/EPSRC OpenPlant Synthetic Biology Research Centre, and support from the University of Cambridge Research Policy Committee through the Synthetic Biology Strategic Research Initiative and CamBridgeSens Strategic Research Network. A number of these funding opportunities are ongoing and we actively promote wide participation both within Cambridge and Norwich, and from external partners - including international collaborations at the level of individuals, companies and institutions. In particular, the new Biomaker Challenge has been designed to be easily portable between institutions and open to industrial collaboration, and we invite anyone interested to get in touch.

SynBio SRI Fund
The SynBio Fund supported eighteen innovative, open and interdisciplinary projects relevant to Synthetic Biology over 2015-16. The aim of the fund was to promote the development of Synthetic Biology as an interdisciplinary field at the University of Cambridge.

OpenPlant Fund
The OpenPlant Fund supports innovative, open and interdisciplinary projects relevant to plant Synthetic Biology. The fund facilitates exchange between the University of Cambridge, the John Innes Centre, and the Earlham Institute for the development of open technologies and responsible innovation.

Biomaker Challenge
Starting in Summer 2017, the Biomaker Challenge is a four-month programme challenging interdisciplinary teams to build low-cost sensors and instruments for biology. From colorimeters to microfluidics and beyond, we’re looking for frugal, open source and DIY approaches to biological experiments.


Activities in Cambridge and Norwich

Opening of a community lab space in Cambridge
In addition to the funding programmes described here, there has been an energetic, volunteer-based effort to establish a community laboratory for biological construction in Cambridge. The Biomakespace is located in the historic old MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology building, and has assembled a well-resourced facility and an active community. More information can be found at http://www.biomake.space 

Informal get-togethers
Cafe Synthetique is an informal get-together for people interested in synthetic biology and construction and interrogation of reprogrammed biological systems. Evening discussion meetings are held monthly at the Panton Arms pub in Cambridge. Details of these and other synthetic biology related events can be found at the Meetup site:
http://www.meetup.com/Cambridge-Synthetic-Bilogy-Meetup

Hands-on making sessions
Science Makers is a monthly meetup bringing together researchers and makers for talks, demos, hands-on making and co-working on projects. It runs every first Saturday of the month at Cambridge Makespace. Details can also be found at:
http://www.synbio.cam.ac.uk/initiatives/science-makers

Cambridge student society
The Cambridge University Synthetic Biology Society hosts undergraduate and postgraduate student activities in the field, including project work. More details at:
http://cusbs.soc.srcf.net